Approved driving instructor (ADI) part 2 (driving ability) test

Posted in: Driving Courses, Driving Instructor Training.

Approved driving instructor (ADI) part 2 (driving ability) test

Understanding your approved driving instructor (ADI) part 2 test result, including what was assessed, what sorts of things counted as faults, and how to improve in each area.

About your driving test result

To pass your driving ability test, you needed to make:

  • no more than 6 driving faults (sometimes called ‘minors’)
  • no serious or dangerous faults (sometimes called ‘majors’)

If you passed

You can:

When your trainer says you’re ready, you can book your ADI part 3 test.

If you do not pass

The examiner will tell you what faults you made.

You can take the test again if you fail at either your first or second attempt.

You have to pay again to book another test. If you fail the ADI part 2 test 3 times, you will have to retake and pass the ADI part 1 test again. You will have to wait 2 years from the date you first passed the ADI part 1 test, to retake the ADI part 1 test.

Find a registered trainer (if you do not already have one) to help you prepare for your retest.

You needed to show you can use the car’s secondary features and controls and know when to use them. This includes things like windscreen wipers, and heating.

You needed to show you can use these while driving, without losing control of the car.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not turning on the windscreen wipers when it starts to rain
  • losing control of the car when using one of the controls
  • not using the demisters to clear the front windscreen when needed

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should read pages 61 to 71 of ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Driving: the Essential Skills’ (2020 edition)

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to show you can:

  • anticipate other road users’ actions and potential hazards
  • react in good time, not at the last minute

You should have been extra careful around more vulnerable road users. This includes:

  • motorcyclists
  • cyclists
  • horse riders
  • pedestrians

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not anticipating or showing awareness of the actions of cyclists and other vulnerable road users
  • not anticipating or showing awareness of other road users
  • pulling up behind a queue of parked vehicles
  • not anticipating that pedestrians are about to cross the road at any time

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to keep a safe amount of distance when passing other road users, stationary vehicles or hazards – at least one metre when possible.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • being too close to a vehicle when passing, even though the road allows for more space
  • moving back in too soon after passing the vehicle or hazard

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to show you can use all the car’s primary controls smoothly and at the correct time. This includes the:

  • accelerator
  • clutch
  • gears
  • brake
  • handbrake or parking brake
  • steering

Your examiner will have monitored this throughout the test.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • over-steering when making a turn, and mounting the kerb
  • keeping the clutch pedal held down (coasting) reducing your control of the car
  • selecting the wrong gear causing a sudden reduction in your speed, forcing vehicles behind you to slow down
  • pressing the brake too hard, or not hard enough

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor or supervising driver. Use the time to familiarise yourself with the car’s primary controls.

You were marked on how you reacted to the examiner’s signal to stop and your control of the car while stopping.

When the examiner asked you, you needed to safely bring the car to a stop. You should have done this without locking the wheels and losing control of the car.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • reacting too slowly when asked to stop
  • locking the wheels causing a skid, particularly for cars without an anti-lock braking system (ABS)

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during a test, or if you believe you need to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

Your examiner will have started the test by carrying out an eyesight check. You needed to read out a vehicle registration (number plate) of a parked car. You will have had 3 chances to do this correctly.

If you did not read it correctly, you will have failed and not been allowed to continue with your test.

You have to book another test and pay again if you failed.

If you need glasses or contact lenses, you must bring them to your next test.

If you have dyslexia, you can declare this when you book your test. You can then write down the vehicle registration instead of reading it out.

You needed to keep a safe distance when driving behind other road users.

Your distance from the vehicle in front should have been appropriate for the conditions of the road.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • driving too close to the vehicle in front
  • not adjusting your distance when there is bad weather, such as rain, ice or fog

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • control – your ability to control the car
  • observation – your observation of your surroundings when parking

You should have parked your car in a designated space, then reversed out. Your car should have been straight and central within the space.

You should have been checking your surroundings throughout, proceeding only when it was safe to do so.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not being positioned within the lines, and not attempting to correct position
  • steering too closely to vehicle in the next bay
  • not making effective all round observations when reversing out

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, read pages 244 to 246 of ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Driving: the Essential Skills’ (2020 edition)

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

The examiner assessed your ability to drive with economy and the environment in mind throughout the test. However, this assessment did not affect the overall result of the test.

You needed to:

  • plan well ahead to avoid unnecessary stopping
  • choose appropriate gears
  • avoid heavy braking
  • avoid over-revving the engine

If you had to stop for a long period, such as at roadworks or railway crossings, you should have considered stopping the engine to reduce pollution and save fuel.

Your examiner will have explained how fuel-efficient your driving was.

How you can improve in this area

To improve in this area you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • overtaking
  • meeting
  • crossing

You needed to show good judgement when overtaking, meeting and crossing other road users, such as knowing when to proceed, and when to wait for a safer opportunity.

You needed to make your intentions clear, and understand the intentions of the other road users.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not giving way to road users that have priority
  • reacting late when meeting an approaching vehicle
  • being too close to a cyclist when overtaking
  • crossing the path of an oncoming vehicle when turning right

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • approach speed – your ability to approach junctions at an appropriate speed
  • observation – your effective observation and judgement of your surroundings
  • turning right – your position when turning right
  • turning left – your position when turning left
  • cutting corners – your ability to avoid cutting corners when turning

You needed to show you can drive through junctions safely. You should have observed your surroundings, made your intentions clear, followed road signs and signals, and properly controlled the car.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • incorrectly judging the speed of an oncoming vehicle, forcing it to slow down when emerging from a junction
  • not checking for other road users when emerging from a slip road, onto a dual carriageway
  • being positioned too far to the left when turning right onto a minor road, holding up vehicles behind you
  • approaching a junction too fast, making it difficult to make observations

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • control – your ability to control the car
  • safety – your ability to perform this action safely

You needed to show you could move off safely and under control throughout your test. This included:

  • from the side of the road
  • on a slope or hill (gradient)
  • from behind a parked vehicle, so you have to move off at an angle
  • at junctions

You should have used your mirrors and checked blind spots to observe your surroundings, and signalled when necessary. Your control of the car should have prevented it from rolling backwards or stalling.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • trying to move off without appropriate control and rolling back
  • not properly checking your blind spots
  • moving off into the path of an oncoming vehicle
  • repeatedly stalling when moving off throughout your test

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to recognise each type of pedestrian crossing and react correctly to each.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • stopping on a crossing (not before)
  • moving off before a pedestrian has completely cleared the crossing
  • approaching a crossing too fast
  • failing to stop at a crossing

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

When asked to by your examiner, you needed to pull up and stop at a safe place on the side of the road. This needed to be done in the first safe place available.

When parked, your car should not have been a hazard to other road users.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • partially or completely blocking a driveway
  • obstructing other road users
  • parking with one or more wheels on the kerb
  • parking too far from the kerb

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • normal driving – your position of the car when driving such as not driving too close to the kerb or lines
  • lane discipline – your ability to maintain your position within the lane

You needed to show you can keep your car correctly positioned on the road, staying within the correct lane, without driving too close to the lines.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • driving too close to the kerb, putting pedestrians at risk
  • driving too close to the centre of the road, putting other road users at risk
  • driving for too long in the right hand lane of a dual carriageway, for no reason
  • straddling lanes causing issues for other road users

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

Before you started driving, you should have performed a few safety checks. This includes making sure:

  • your seat is positioned correctly and you can reach all the controls
  • your mirrors are positioned correctly
  • all doors are shut
  • the handbrake or parking brake is on
  • the gear is in neutral

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • starting the car with the gear not in neutral
  • adjusting seat or mirrors while driving

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • appropriate speed – your ability to drive at an appropriate speed for the road and traffic conditions
  • undue hesitation – your ability to maintain progress, and not hesitate and slow down when you did not need to

You should have driven at a speed appropriate for the road and traffic conditions, without holding up other road users.

Your examiner will have monitored this throughout the test.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not emerging from a junction when it is safe to do so
  • driving too slow unnecessarily, holding up following traffic
  • driving well below the speed limit on clear roads
  • waiting unecessairly for another road user to pass who has clearly given way to you

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You should have recognised and reacted correctly to signs and signals on the road. This included:

  • road signs
  • road markings
  • traffic lights
  • traffic controllers
  • other road users

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • taking up space meant for cyclists when stopping at a red traffic light
  • reacting late or not at all to a speed limit change sign
  • not stopping at a compulsory stop sign
  • driving in a bus lane when sign says you should not
  • driving in an incorrect lane that was clearly marked

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • control – your ability to control the car while reversing
  • observation – your ability to check your surroundings for other road users or hazards while parking

Your examiner will have asked you to either:

  • reverse park into a space on the side of the road, behind another car – you should have been within 2 car lengths of the vehicle in front, and parallel to the kerb
  • reverse into a parking bay, then drive out – you should have been straight and central with in the space before exiting

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • having to reposition the car a lot, due to poor control
  • touching or driving over the pavement
  • not taking all round effective observations
  • not finishing within the marked bay

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • control – your ability to control the car when reversing
  • observation – your ability to check your surroundings for other road users or hazards

You needed to pull up on the right hand side of the road, and reverse for 2 car lengths. You should have remained reasonably close to the kerb, without touching it.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • not being aware of a hazard or other road user when reversing
  • relying on just the mirrors to check surroundings
  • touching or driving onto the kerb
  • not judging oncoming traffic safely when moving across to the right
  • being too far from the kerb when parked

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You were marked on:

  • necessary – your ability to use signals when you needed to
  • correctly – your ability to use the correct signals
  • timed – your ability to use signals that are not too late or too early

Throughout the test, you should have used appropriate signals to let everyone around know what you were about to do. This should have been done in good time.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • signalling left or right, but not turning
  • signalling right at a roundabout when you want to go ahead
  • signalling too late for the signal to be effective

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to show you can use your rear view mirror and door mirrors (wing mirrors) to see what’s behind or to the side of your car. This should be done in good time, well before appropriate situations.

You needed to show you can use them at the correct time, some situations where you needed to use mirrors include:

  • signalling
  • changing direction or lanes
  • changing speed

Your examiner will monitor this throughout your test.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • checking mirrors after or at the same time as signalling
  • changing lanes on a roundabout without checking your mirrors effectively
  • trying to change lanes on a dual carriageway without checking your mirrors effectively
  • pulling up at the side of the road without signalling to following traffic when appropriate

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You needed to show you can drive at a safe and reasonable speed when appropriate. Your examiner will have assessed this throughout your test.

You should have taken into consideration the conditions of the road, the amount of traffic, road signs and signals, and the speed limit. You should have been driving at a speed where you could stop safely, well within the distance you could see to be clear.

Examples of faults

Some of the most common faults for this area include:

  • driving over the speed limit
  • not adjusting your speed to road conditions

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

You will have been asked 5 vehicle safety questions during your test.

The examiner will have asked you:

  • 3 ‘tell me’ questions (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving
  • 2 ‘show me’ questions (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving

Examples of faults

You will have been given a driving fault for every incorrect answer.

You will have been given a serious fault if you answered all 5 questions incorrectly, or lost control of the vehicle when answering a ‘show me’ question.

Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made.

How you can improve in this area

To improve in this area, read:

If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer.

If you passed

Find out what the next steps are to completing your ADI training.

If you did not pass

You can take the test again if you fail at either your first or second attempt.

You have to pay again to book another test.

If you fail the ADI part 2 test 3 times, you will have to retake and pass the ADI part 1 test again.

Find out more about your rights if you did not pass.

Find a registered trainer (if you do not already have one) to help you prepare for your test.


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Clearance to obstructions,Hidethis section You needed to keep a safe amount of distance when passing other road users, stationary vehicles or hazards – at least one metre when possible. Examples of faults Some of the most common faults for this area include: being too close to a vehicle when passing, even though the road allows for more space moving back in too soon after passing the vehicle or hazard Your examiner may have explained the specific details of any faults you made. How you can improve in this area If you made faults in this area during your test, or if you want to improve in this area, you should: check rule of The Highway Code 152 read pages 181 to 183 of ‘The Official DVSA Guide to Driving: the Essential Skills’ (2020 edition) If you need to rebook the test, spend time practising and improving this skill with your driving instructor trainer. Control,Hidethis section You needed to show you can use all the car’s primary controls smoothly and at the correct time. 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    Tony Cross from Ilminster, Somerset has passed his ADI Part 3 test of instructional ability First Time in Taunton, Somerset. My training to become an ADI with Blue School of Motoring was a great experience. The knowledge and structure supplied by Damien was perfect for me and his flexibility to work around my commitments was extremely helpful. Even during my second year of training which saw many months of lockdown we were still able to work on topics via Zoom which were a great help. The one to one training felt personal and I learnt a huge amount, not only about becoming a driving instructor but also about myself. After passing part 3 and qualifying as an ADI in a shorter time frame than usual due to Covid lockdowns was a true indication of the quality and professional coaching I received. Tony has achieved an amazing result, as his training was stopped several times over the lockdowns and when he finally managed to get his pink licence and start teaching clients in December of 2020, he only had a few weeks before the lockdown started. When we were allowed to teach again in April 2021 he only had 4 weeks to prepare for his part 3. All the best from Damien your trainer at Blue Tony Cross (ADI)Approved Driving Instructor Blue School of Motoring Tony Cross Passes Part 3 ADI Instructor Test

  • Part 3 Test Pass for Duncan Ashman

    ‘I was very pleased with the prompt and professional service offered by Damien at the Blue School of Motoring.  In a limited time frame , my goals and learning objectives were clearly defined by Damien. He also instilled some much needed confidence and belief , which as you see you can see ,by my green badge selfie , was a great help in enabling me to pass my ADI Part 3 exam recently. ‘ Duncan Ashman.   Part Three Rescue If you have just had a problem with your part 3 test and were not successful. Don’t worry there is always help at hand from one of our experienced ADI’s. There could be various reasons why the score you got was not higher enough to pass, such as: The method, clarity, adequacy and correctness of instruction given, or maybe it was the analysis and correction of faults committed by the pupil, your core competencies. Or it could just be nerves we all suffer from that and if your confidence has been a bit dented then maybe a few hours of rebuilding your basic skills will give you the drive to pass next time. All of these things can rectified with perhaps a different set of eyes, some of the area’s you failed on are basic core competencies, fault analysis and timing of intervention, and maybe its juts the ability to take control back in a situation where the examiner is now in control. It’s always best not to leave it until your third attempt before you try another trainer. At Blue our ORDIT Driving Instructor Trainers will provide a course based on your individual requirements, and we will go over with you first and build a strategy for your next successful part three attempt. Training courses are structured for you, you can either do a few hours or half a day or a complete days training, sometimes this dependant on how far away you live, when your next part 3 attempt is, so we are very flexible and always willing to help you the client. Part 3 ADI Test pass for Duncan Ashman  

  • Funny (and Scary) Things That Could Happen To a New Driving instructor in 2020

    Becoming a driving instructor is a wonderful, rewarding way to make good money helping impart your knowledge and skills to a new generation of responsible drivers. If you’ve recently joined our ranks, welcome! 2020 is sure to be an exciting year as more and more people of all ages and backgrounds decide that this is the year where they’ll take control of their on-the-road autonomy and learn to drive. Being a driving instructor is a great career for those who crave variety and independence. No two days will ever be the same, and you’ll get to make a lasting difference to people’s lives as you imbue them with the skills to navigate our nation’s highways in safety and self-confidence. But, as any veteran driving instructor will tell you, there will also be times when you’re unsure whether to double up with laughter or weep for the future of humanity. You may have numerous moments where your life flashes before your eyes even if you find yourself laughing heartily about them 24 hours later. Image by Manfred Richer via Pixabay As the year draws to a close, let’s look at some hilarious (and scary) things that could happen to you while giving driving lessons in 2020. Hopefully, you won’t encounter them all in your first year… Autocorrect mishaps Many of your cool young students will likely prefer to communicate via text when arranging their lessons rather than over the phone. And this can often result in unintentional hilarity. From dubious “xxx”s sent at the end of a message from students who’ve just been texting their loved ones to autocorrect mishaps that make you fear for your life. Or at the very least, your marriage! Warning light misinterpretations A comprehensive knowledge of warning lights is both an essential part of vehicle maintenance and integral to safe driving. But… sometimes the symbology on warning lights isn’t as straightforward as you’d imagine. It’s possible that your students may misinterpret the radiator warning light as “someone’s thrown the keys in the river” or ESP warning light means “Spanish”. Or that the seatbelt warning sign means that they should take their hands off the steering wheel and place them by their sides. Which could have terrifying consequences. Footwear fails Today’s teenagers are as socially active and fashion conscious as they’ve always been. And in their diligence to attend your lesson on time, they may step into your car wearing their last night out’s footwear. While driving in heels isn’t illegal, it can seriously compromise a driver’s control of the brakes and result in some dashboard-grippingly close encounters at roundabouts. Wardrobe miscalculations Finally… No matter how improbable it may seem, no matter how many times they are given prior notice of a lesson, it’s extremely likely that at least one of your students will race up to your car to attend their lesson in a onesie. Or their pyjamas. Or some equally bizarre wardrobe miscalculation. Whether they’ve overslept or taken your advice on dressing comfortably for lessons a little bit too literally, it’s sure to result in some chucklesome moments throughout the year.  

  • Check Test ADI Form

    Part Three Driving Instructor Test Driving Instructor Trainers will provide a course based on the following guidelines – Part 3 Test of Instructional Ability. Part Three Driving Instructor Test We will provide a complete training programme When you join Blue for a training course we first meet up for an informal chat, discuss your requirements and timescale that you would like to complete the course by. The Training The training starts with one to one in car, so all the attention is focused on you the trainee, every session is recorded and you are given a signed copy of all course material for that day, and of course the training is spread over several weeks or months, depending on your availability. What you’ll be marked on in your Part 3 Test You’ll be marked on 17 areas of competence that are grouped into 3 categories: lesson planning risk management teaching and learning strategies Conducting the Part Three Test The test must be conducted in either English or Welsh. Interpreters for the purpose of translating any other language are not allowed. If a PDI requires a Welsh-speaking examiner, they should request this on their application. Examiners will observe the PDI delivering a normal lesson with a pupil for about an hour. They will assess the PDI’s delivery of instruction to their pupil based on the criteria set out on ADI Part 3/SC and the National Standards for driver and rider training. An increasing number of instructors provide training to the emergency services. This training can include taking advantage of legal exemptions such as exceeding speed limits or not complying with traffic signs. The examiner should tell the PDI that they cannot accompany the lesson for health and safety reasons if they are told that the proposed lesson plan includes elements, which require the trainee to take advantage of the exemptions. The examiner must stop the test if the PDI refuses to change the lesson plan to take out these elements. Before the lesson starts, the examiner will ask the PDI some questions about their pupil. They should be able to state: • roughly how many hours of tuition their pupil has had • whether their pupil is getting any other practice, e.g. from parents or others  • their pupil’s strengths and areas for development The PDI should show the examiner the pupil’s driver’s record (if they have one) before the start of the lesson to help explain their current progress in their agreed training programme. To fully satisfy this requirement the PDI must: • actively recognise the need to understand the pupil’s experience and background • ask suitable questions  • encourage the pupil to talk about their goals, concerns etc. and actively listen to what the pupil has to say  • understand the significance of what they say • recognise other indications, e.g. body language, that the pupil is trying to express something but perhaps cannot find the right words These are what we mean by the elements. Another way to express it would be to think of these as the building blocks, which go to make up the lower level competence, which is being assessed.

  • Do You Think You Could Teach Someone To Drive

    Do You Think You Could Teach Someone To Drive? Teaching someone to drive is a commitment a lot of people underestimate; you’re going to have to attend weekly lessons for multiple people, you’ll have to make sure every student is test ready in both skill and confidence, and you’ll have to make sure you’re always using an open and friendly tone with anyone in the driver’s seat. And those are just the implicit skills! So if you already feel able to cross all of those off your list, and now you’re seriously looking into how to become a driving instructor, this is the post to double check yourself with. You want your career to be a success, and you want to be the best teacher you ever could be; here’s a few questions to ask yourself. Being able to ready people for gaining one of the most important life skills out there can be a real high, as long as you’re the type of person for it! (Source) Do You Have the Patience? Seeing as you’re someone who already knows how to drive, sitting in the passenger seat and watching someone fail at something that might seem so simple to you can be hard to handle. You might get annoyed, you might get frustrated, and you might just let all that go in the way you speak to your learner. But that’s not going to do you or them any good! So you need to make sure you’ve got plenty of patience to help someone out, as there’s a good chance they’re going to be very stressed sitting behind the driver’s wheel for the first, second, and third times. You need to take your own time in return, and always be a reliable and patient teacher to turn to when even ‘obvious’ questions need to be answered. Are You Responsible Enough? That seems like a question with an obvious answer, but you need to be someone who has the right amount of responsibility on your side. And that involves having all the right paperwork constantly to hand (a.k.a any licenses and registrations, your ID as a qualified teacher etc.), which can often be simply forgotten back at home. You’re also going to need the right insurance on your side, and there’s no guarantee the school you’re working for has the type that can over you as well. Use sites like that of Insurance4MotorTrade to help your career here, as they have plenty of details for you to follow up on Could it Work for Your Schedule? Being a driver instructor means your schedule is often going to revolve around other people’s availabilities, and that can be very frustrating. You’re constantly going to have to date lessons based on your learners needs, and sometimes that just won’t be possible according to your own diary. So you need to be as open and available as you can be, and that can be very energy sucking! Teaching someone to drive is a very big commitment; you’ve got to be incredibly prepared.    

  • Bracknell Driving Lessons for Emily

    Huge shout out to Emily for passing her driving test first time today at Chertsey. Emily passed with 0 driving faults. Great result Emily wishing you all the best for the future from Mick your instructor and all the team at Blue School Franchise Partner Positions in Bracknell There are plenty of franchise positions out there but we offer a Very competitive package Become a Driving Instructor in Berkshire Why work for a low hourly rate, when you can make much more than that, at Blue. We are looking for qualified instructors (Approved Driving Instructor) to join Blue School of Motoring ASAP. If you are teaching in either Manual or Automatic cars we are looking for both types of driving instructors in the Bracknell area Special Intro Offer First Few Months Franchise FREE All the students you need Earn a good rate of pay, not cheap lessons rates Friendly and Helpful team members at Blue Work the Hours you want Full CPD courses for Free For Qualified Instructors, ADI’s only Packages Start from as little as £45 Free marketing in your local Bracknell area, to attract the best customers for you. Free Roof Box, Business Cards, Training Material and online diary No, long term fixed contracts No set up fees. Full support on building your business. Agreed Geographical area’s to work, that are close to home No hidden costs A mutually beneficial agreement, that is negotiated between both parties   Great business support and training in class or on road    

  • Become a driving insructor

    How to Become a Driving Instructor Become a driving instructor and work for yourself as a franchised self employed driver trainer. Being an approved driving instructor (ADI) can be a very rewarding career, and you’ll help people to learn an important skill for life. Blue is a training company that is ORDIT (Official Registered Driving Instructor Trainer)  Government registered. All of our trainers are vetted assessed by the DVSA examiners.  Blue offers the complete driving instructor training programme for anybody who wishes to train as a driving instructor. All the official exams are covered and a full training programme is provided by Blue. The job involves working with all sorts of people so you’ll need good people skills as well as patience and understanding a thorough knowledge of the theory and practice of driving an ability to teach awareness of changes in the regulations for driving tests, as well as driving instruction business sense. You can start the process off with a free no obligation one to one meeting and discuss the course in more detail. You will the if you decide to do so be assigned a trainer who will take you all way through your career training course. You can start training for as little as £75 for your first start up training session. We cover and provide training for all the different tests part 1 , 2 & 3. . The course is designed to fit around your current career. Blue School of Motoring Driving Instructor Training has a variety of flexible training options, to fit in with your current situation. There are also courses available for existing ADI’s who would like some additional training, such as Check Test Training or help on improving your pass rate, whatever it is, we can help structure the course for yo

  • part 3 rescue training courses

    How to Become a Driving Instructor Become a driving instructor and work for yourself as a franchised self-employed driver trainer. Being an approved driving instructor (ADI) can be a very rewarding career, and you’ll help people to learn an important skill for life. Blue is a training company that is ORDIT (Official Registered Driving Instructor Trainer) Government registered. All of our trainers are vetted assessed by the DVSA examiners. Blue offers the complete driving instructor training programme for anybody who wishes to train as a driving instructor. All the official exams are covered and a full training programme is provided by Blue. The job involves working with all sorts of people so you’ll need good people skills as well as patience and understanding a thorough knowledge of the theory and practice of driving an ability to teach awareness of changes in the regulations for driving tests, as well as driving instruction business sense. You can start the process off with a free no obligation one to one meeting and discuss the course in more detail. You will the if you decide to do so be assigned a trainer who will take you all way through your career training course. You can start training for as little as £75 for your first start up training session. We cover and provide training for all the different tests generic valium white pill part 1 , 2 & 3. . The course is designed to fit around your current career. Blue School of Motoring Driving Instructor Training has a variety of flexible training options, to fit in with your current situation. There are also courses available for existing ADI’s who would like some additional training, such as Check Test Training or help on improving your pass rate, whatever it is, we can help structure the course for you. At Blue, we assist our trainees on their course and its not just about passing the tests. We’ll also equip you with all the skills you need to become a professional driving instructor once you qualify. You’ll enjoy the freedom of being self-employed, but when you need a helping hand, we’ll be there to support you. You’ll benefit from a mentor who will be able to answer all your questions, either by phone in the classroom, on the road or via email. How to apply First you’ll need to apply to the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) to become an ADI. To do this you’ll need to give details about your current driving licence including any driving offences. You’ll also need a criminal records disclosure number. You can apply to become an ADI on GOV.UK Criminal record check Before you can apply to become an ADI, you’ll need to have a criminal record check. Apply for your check at GOV.UK. Part 1 Our Courses Part 2 Our Course Part 3 Our Course    

  • 3349-driving-instructor-training

    Become a driving instructor, and take one of our flexible franchises. There are plenty of franchise positions out there But we offer a Very competitive package. Why work for a low hourly rate, when You can make much more than that, at Blue. We are looking for qualified instructors (Approved Driving Instructor) to join Blue School of Motoring ASAP. If you are teaching in either Manual or Automatic cars we are looking for both types of driving instructors in the Bracknell area.

  • Part Three The Ability to instruct The main object of this test is to assess the quality and ability of you the PDI(Potential Driving Instructor) to ask a series of questions about a candidate’s previous knowledge of driving or car controls. You may ask yourself what would someone who has never driven a car before know about driving, well you would be surprised what a 17 year old knows, and if you don’t ask, you won’t find out. But you may also be asked to role play with a FLH(Full Licence Holder) someone who has driven for a number of years. So you need to be prepared for any type of driver. When you arrive at the test centre you will be asked to sign a declaration form, this is the marking sheet that also shows what PST’s(Pre Ste Tests) you will be getting for your part three, always take your time when signing your name so you see what you are getting. part 3 training car The part 3 exercises For each of the Part 3 Test of Instructional Ability the examiner will choose one of the exercises given below as the basis of the instruction: – safety precautions on entering the car and explanation of the controls – moving off and making normal stops – reversing and reversing into limited openings to the right or left – turning the vehicle round in the road to face the opposite direction, using forward and reverse gears – parking close to the kerb, using forward and reverse gears – how to make an emergency stop and practical instruction in the use of mirrors – approaching and turning corners – judgement of speed, making progress and general road positioning – dealing with road junctions – dealing with crossroads – dealing with pedestrian crossings and giving correct signals in a clear and unmistakable manner – overtaking, meeting and crossing the path of other road users, allowing adequate clearance. The instruction you give should be tailored to the time available and to the standard of the pupil being role-played by the DSA examiner. You will probably find it helpful to establish the depth of the pupils knowledge in each phase, by asking questions and observing the pupils performance as you would with a real pupil you had not taught before. How will I be assessed for the part 3? In assessing your performance, the DSA examiner will take into account: the method, clarity, adequacy and correctness of instruction given the observation, analysis and correction of faults committed by the pupil your general manner the way you deal with the two different roles played by the examiner, beginner, partly trained, trained, or FLH(Full Licence Holder. You will be expected to maintain control of the lesson, be patient and tactful and give encouragement to the pupil at all times. What is assessed is the relevance of the instruction for the ability of the pupil and to the particular conditions on the road on the day of the test. Blue Instructor Training will provide the most appropriate and up to date training to help you prepare the Part 3 examination

  • If you are fed up with working for a company where you get no recognition for your hard work, or your just fed up with working 9-5 then maybe a career as a driving instructor would suit you.

  • Driving instructors teach people of all ages how to operate a vehicle on the road and therefore need to be extremely patient and have excellent communication skills. There’s plenty of work in this sector, with many jobs advertised so if you’re up for the challenge here are 10 simple steps on how to become a fully-qualified instructor.

  • 000-driving-lessons-instructor-berkshire-surrey

    Ever wanted to work for yourself and have your own business to run, but with the safety net of an established brand behind you giving you the training and support required when you need it.

  • The Driving Standards Agency (DSA) published the ‘National standard for driver and rider training’ in 2011. It sets out the skills, knowledge and understanding that you need to be an effective trainer.

  • The driving instructor practical test of driving ability consists of tests of eyesight, safety questions and driving technique. The test will last for about one hour. You must pass all parts of the test at the same time. Blue will prepare you for the part 2, with all the training you need to prepare yourself for this advanced test, including a mock test prior to you taking the real thing.

  • Before you take you check test at least take some training from one of our friendly ADI’s who have passed the check test My advice is don’t leave it a moment too long, that grade 4, 5 or 6 is vitally important to your income, as many ADI’s fail, and then put under pressure for their next check test

  • We are looking for qualified instructors (Approved Driving Instructor) to join Blue School of Motoring ASAP.